6 Trial Presentation Tips You Can Learn From Actors

Ever wondered why courtroom scenes are frequently shown all over TV shows and movies? That is most often because the audience loves the drama that comes with the clash between right and wrong.

With all that drama, you can barely notice the level of skill actors need to behavior like lawyers. However, actors have been known to study the best lawyers in the world to determine what it takes to get the scene right. That is why we can learn a lot from Hollywood actors in what it takes to make a trial presentation compelling.

Here are 6 Trial Presentation Tips You Can Learn From Actors.

Make Great preparation


By the time actors perform, they will already know everything they need to know about the plot and their role in it. A successful presentation requires hours of preparation. You don’t have to start your presentation as an essay but rather an effective method of communication. If you write your presentation down on flashcards to just read each out one by one, this will create an impersonal delivery and lose the audience’s attention.

Practice, Practice, Practice


While most actors might not have what it takes to be an actual lawyer, they can surely pull it off in their scenes. This is due to hours of practicing. It is important to practice what you are going to say and how you will deliver it. Listen to the sound and confidence in your voice.

Are your nerves causing you to feel disrupted? Do you find yourself speaking too fast? You can deliver your speech in an audio recorder to get a glimpse of how you sound like to an audience. To help you improve, you can send it to a colleague or family to help you gain better feedback.

Warm Up


Even with hours of practice and preparation, do not underestimate the tools you need to perform. Actors will never walk onstage without warming up. Before walking into the courtroom, warm up your voice and move around. Take deep breaths as you stand to get your blood flowing. Make sure to keep your body and voice expressive as this will help activate concentration and calm the nerves.

Use Simple Language


The best screenwriters know how to make simple sentences go far. Using layman’s terms and language will lay out a forward and emotional sense in your opening statement.

Relate to the Jury


It is important to create a moment that relates to the jury. Ideally, consider touching the most crucial part of the case as it is important to relate the knowledge of a local custom to something meaningful.

Be Ready to Respond


Anything can happen during a performance. This forces actors to prepare for the unexpected. Someone may miss their cue or end up on the wrong stage. Remember to take the time to breathe and read the audience.

Conclusion

You’ve done your work, checked your facts, understand your laws and know what you want as well as how you will get it. Just remember to keep your eyes on the juror and invite your audience to care about what you are trying to say.

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Jason Brown

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